Soldier On Anzac Appeal

Soldier On Anzac Appeal

Parramatta College has chosen to support Soldier On by signing a pledge to support contemporary veterans in finding employment upon transition from the Defence force to civilian life. In the lead up to ANZAC Day, we have been provided with a series of eight amazing stories that tell of the challenges faced by our ANZACs of 100 years ago.

There were no support services available to support our ANZACs following World War I to deal with the trauma experienced from their service.

Many of our contemporary veterans often face the same hardships.

We now know how these veterans and their families can be better supported and Soldier On’s mission is to support our contemporary veterans and their families. These stories have been put together by the staff at both the Australian War Memorial and Soldier On.

We invite you make a donation so that Soldier On can continue to support our modern-day veterans and their families in more locations around Australia. You can donate by clicking where it says “Click here to donate” within the stories or by clicking here:

Thank you for your support from the team at Soldier On.


Private Douglas Grant



Whilst we as a country have learnt from the mistakes made when assisting veterans and their families, the struggles that the veteran community face have not gone away. The struggle to find work after serving in the defence force, for example, is one that impacted veterans 100 years ago, and contemporary veterans today. Their stories reflect this struggle. Read them here.


Corporal David Austin



Recognising the impacts service has on a person is important. But ensuring they access the services needed to help them secure their future is equally as important. Their two stories showcase the importance of getting help when it is needed. Read them here.


Major General Harold ‘Pompey’ Elliott



Ensuring the issues that the veteran community face gain better understanding and more awareness in Australia, is something that has been fought for by many, especially since WWI. These are the stories of two such people who pushed for greater recognition of what veterans have gone through, Harold ‘Pompey’ Elliot and Ben Farinazzo. Read them here.

Captain Hugo Throssell VC



In war, it is not just the immediate injuries and impacts that need to be attended to, but also those that occur after. The following two stories poignantly reflect this. Read them here.


Private Joseph Buckley



Private Joseph Buckley and Gabrielle Carey
For many who have left the navy, army, air force, or other national security agencies, they have struggled to not only find a community, but also a sense of purpose after they separate and transition out. For some, they are able to regain this sense of purpose and find a new community. For others, this does not happen. These two stories showcase how a lost sense of purpose can affect a person. Read them here.


Private George Giles



Private George Giles and James Millis
Whilst the wounds of the body are able to in most cases be easily identified, it is the impacts on the mind that aren’t always so readily recognised. These two stories from two different eras highlight the need to be vigilant in not only spotting issues, but also in taking action. Read them here.


Private Martin OMeara VC



Private Martin O’Meara VC and Sarah Watson
Europe is on the bucket list for many people for a variety of reasons. The history, the culture, and the myriad of sights and wonders are recognised throughout the world. However, not all those who go to Europe experience the joys the country can bring. And not all who go to Europe do so because of the cuisine. These following two stories show two completely different experiences. Read them here.


Private Thomas Marsh



Private Thomas Marsh and David ‘Dave’ Stafford Finney
Whilst the majority of these shared stories have seen our contemporary veterans and family members go on to secure their futures, this is not always the case. For some, what they go through is too much. Read them here.